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Travel podcasts’ popularity increases

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Travel podcasts’ popularity increases

Travel podcasts’ popularity increases

Travel

Podcasting is gaining traction when it comes to traveling

Traditional travel channels such as video and magazines are getting more company in the form of podcasts.

The New York Times reports that while podcasts have long been part of the offerings of such established media brands as Conde Nast Traveler, businesses are now getting into the game. The Times reports:

Taking travel to another dimension — in a way that may encourage positive reviews and build a brand — is the goal of many podcasts now proliferating across the web, and mostly free to access. The Carlyle, a Rosewood Hotel in New York is launching a podcast in January featuring interviews with celebrity guests in advance of the 2018 movie Always at the Carlyle on the subject. The Detroit Foundation Hotel, opened last spring, houses a podcast studio where Hillary Sawchuk, the host of A Drink With podcasts, has interviewed Detroit personalities, entrepreneurs and artists, sessions that are available on the hotel website. In its first episode released in October, the new travel podcast Unmapped offers the aural travel diary, complete with bumps in the road, of the blogger Angelina Zeppieri.

In an age when virtually every smartphone has a voice recorder, podcasting is a cost-effective medium, which could help explain its surge in listeners. In its 2017 report, Edison Research, which tracks digital audio and podcast consumption among other new media, found that 40 percent of Americans over the age of 12 have listened to a podcast, and 24 percent have listened to one in the prior month, up 21 percent versus the year before. Six in 10 respondents said they were familiar with the term “podcasting,” a 22 percent increase over two years.

When it launched its World Nomads Podcast earlier this year, the travel insurance company World Nomads spent less than $4,000 to construct a professional recording studio. The podcast, which has covered topics that include how small towns in Croatia are being overrun by tourists, costs under $200 a month to edit and $20 for podcast hosting.

“There will always be a place for a few friends sitting around a kitchen table with a USB microphone and a laptop, as long as they talk about interesting stuff. It’s the wonderfully democratized end of broadcasting,” wrote Phil Sylvester, the communications manager for World Nomads, in an email.

 

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